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Testicular Cancer

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Being diagnosed with testicular cancer is devastating – but providing the cancer is detected early enough, treatment can be very successful.

Mr Suks Minhas

Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer affects the testicles and most often occurs in men between the ages of 15 and 49.

The testicles are a vital part of the male reproductive system. It is there that sperm and testosterone are produced. Both are major elements in male sexual development.

Testicular cancer is treatable and there are high success rates in those who have been diagnosed with the disease. Experts state that testicular cancer is a rare form of the disease when compared to other forms of cancer and can be treated effectively.

Symptoms

Testicular cancer may affect only one of the testicles. Due to it being most common for just one testicle to be affected, it allows men to compare their testicles when determining if there is an issue.

There are a number of symptoms men can experience when they develop testicular cancer. These symptoms may include:

  • A lump on the testicle,
  • An enlargement of a testicle,
  • A heavy feeling in the scrotum,
  • A dull ache in the stomach, side, or groin,
  • A collection of fluid in the scrotum that house the testicles,
  • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or groin,
  • Enlargement or soreness in the chest and breast area, and
  • Back pain

Diagnosing

Men will often discover testicular cancer themselves due to the symptoms that occur. Doctors can also diagnose the disease through examination. A general practitioner will then send a patient to have an ultrasound of the testicles and blood tests to confirm the original diagnoses.

Treating

Testicular cancer treatment varies due to a variety factors including the time in which it was discovered, the stage of the disease, and a patient’s overall health.

Depending on the severity of the cancer, a patient could have their testicle or lymph nodes removed. Radiation and chemotherapy can also be used to treat the cancer. In some cases, patients will have both surgery and radiation or chemotherapy to treat the disease.

By removing the testicles, a patient’s chance of making a full recovery is higher than if the testicles are kept intact. Men who have a cancerous testicle removed can still father children despite the procedure.

Do you have any questions or would like to make an appointment?

Contact Mr Suks Minhas to see how he can help on +44 (0)20 7224 5089 or use the contact form

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London Andrology

One of the UK’s most eminent andrologists

Mr Suks Minhas is widely regarded as a leader in the field of men’s health. With specialist interest and expertise in areas including male fertility and erectile dysfunction, penile and testicular cancers and male urology, he sees patients from all over the UK covering a vast range of concerns.

Mr Suks Minhas

Mr Suks Minhas is widely regarded as a leader in the field of men’s health. With specialist interest and expertise in areas including male fertility and erectile dysfunction, penile and testicular cancers and male urology, he sees patients from all over the UK covering a vast range of concerns.

Contact Mr Suks Minhas

Contact Mr Suks Minhas

If you have any questions or would like to make an appointment please use any of the following:

Telephone

+44 (0)20 7224 5089

Email

Email either Joanna Milton or Lorraine Dawkins at:
Joanna.Milton@hcahealthcare.co.uk
lorraine.dawkins2@hcahealthcare.co.uk